Nemesis: General Discussion

Matt N

TS Member
Favourite Ride
Mako (SeaWorld Orlando)
I was going to say; Clermont Steel Fabricators in Ohio is the place to keep an eye on!

Thankfully, many US enthusiasts do keep tabs on it on a regular basis, so if there’s new track there, we’ll almost certainly hear about it!
 

Rick

TS Member
Favourite Ride
Crux
No it isn't. They have a European fabrication plant too. Somewhere near Barcelona I believe.

Maybe for other parts for coasters perhaps, but every piece of B&M track that has ever been produced has come from the Clermont steel fabricators.
I knew this debate would occur as soon as I saw that post, there have been several things in the past that suggest that Clermont only produce track for North America - I don't know what is correct and what is not. However:

This interview with the company, for example (via Wayback Machine), says quite clearly:

“It all started back in 1989 when Walter Bolliger came to my office and asked if we would be interested in building track for their company,” said Miller. “They had seen some of our work on the supports for the Arrow coaster at Kings Island, (Vortex,) and Six Flags Great America, (Shockwave,) and liked what they saw. Now they keep us busy seven days a week with all their projects. Every piece of track for every one of their roller coasters in the United States is made right here in Ohio.

The former part of that sentence is one thing, the latter is quite an odd thing to say if you're shipping track across the globe as their only supplier - surely you'd hang your hat on that.

From the same interview:

"The track begins as flat sheets of steel and pipe for the support columns is sourced in the United States. The bent pieces of track pipe are brought in from Europe."
 

Mikw

TS Member
I certainly agree; I think my tastes have certainly changed since I first started this hobby. When I started this hobby, I was in it for intense coasters, but these days, I’ve grown to love the more fun and rerideable coasters over the out and out intense ones, and I actually think that too much intensity can be detrimental to a ride.

Also, I certainly agree with your teens being where your opinions change the most; I think puberty can change one’s perspective on just about anything…
Wait until your mid life crisis!

I had mine in my teens and have been a miserable old man ever since. :)
 

MakoMania

TS Member
I knew this debate would occur as soon as I saw that post, there have been several things in the past that suggest that Clermont only produce track for North America - I don't know what is correct and what is not. However:

This interview with the company, for example (via Wayback Machine), says quite clearly:

“It all started back in 1989 when Walter Bolliger came to my office and asked if we would be interested in building track for their company,” said Miller. “They had seen some of our work on the supports for the Arrow coaster at Kings Island, (Vortex,) and Six Flags Great America, (Shockwave,) and liked what they saw. Now they keep us busy seven days a week with all their projects. Every piece of track for every one of their roller coasters in the United States is made right here in Ohio.

The former part of that sentence is one thing, the latter is quite an odd thing to say if you're shipping track across the globe as their only supplier - surely you'd hang your hat on that.

From the same interview:

"The track begins as flat sheets of steel and pipe for the support columns is sourced in the United States. The bent pieces of track pipe are brought in from Europe."
We have seen track for European and Asian coasters come from Claremont though right? I specifically recall Fenix at Toverland. I was also at an event at SeaWorld Orlando in 2019 where as part of a discussion about Mako the director of ride procurement for SEAS stated all B&M coaster track globally comes from Claremont.

One thing is for absolutely sure though, there is far more track produced annually at Claremont than is erected in the United States.
 

rob666

TS Member
I knew this debate would occur as soon as I saw that post, there have been several things in the past that suggest that Clermont only produce track for North America - I don't know what is correct and what is not. However:

This interview with the company, for example (via Wayback Machine), says quite clearly:

“It all started back in 1989 when Walter Bolliger came to my office and asked if we would be interested in building track for their company,” said Miller. “They had seen some of our work on the supports for the Arrow coaster at Kings Island, (Vortex,) and Six Flags Great America, (Shockwave,) and liked what they saw. Now they keep us busy seven days a week with all their projects. Every piece of track for every one of their roller coasters in the United States is made right here in Ohio.

The former part of that sentence is one thing, the latter is quite an odd thing to say if you're shipping track across the globe as their only supplier - surely you'd hang your hat on that.

From the same interview:

"The track begins as flat sheets of steel and pipe for the support columns is sourced in the United States. The bent pieces of track pipe are brought in from Europe."

Nothing like our Rick popping up to put the facts straight!
The fine details of coasterism never fail to amuse me!
 

WillPS

TS Member
Getting a bit carried away here aren't we? I can't see anything other than rumour that this is even needed, let alone is happening imminently.
 

Steve74

TS Member
Getting a bit carried away here aren't we? I can't see anything other than rumour that this is even needed, let alone is happening imminently.
If you look back at my original post about watching B&M factories, you'll see I was being sarcastic and joking :D
 

JAperson

TS Member
At the top of the hill of the woods in the extension queue there is a blue tin shed that has has an electric fuss boxx (presumably not live) which my family seem to think used to hold vending machines however it seems odd to leave it standing with nothing in it. The extension queue is used to that length fairly often and particularly during the last two seasons. Is it really wise to just leave it there? Surely they could put vending machines back in it?
 

jon81uk

TS Member
At the top of the hill of the woods in the extension queue there is a blue tin shed that has has an electric fuss boxx (presumably not live) which my family seem to think used to hold vending machines however it seems odd to leave it standing with nothing in it. The extension queue is used to that length fairly often and particularly during the last two seasons. Is it really wise to just leave it there? Surely they could put vending machines back in it?

Many people don't like using vending machines as they can go wrong, also fewer people carrying coins due to covid so all machines would need contactless readers. Then if people buy a bottle of drink and don't finish it in a fast moving queue then its another loose item to store before riding.
I think the park thought they were a good idea years ago but had moved away from using them, preferring staffed kiosks, although some of those were removed or converted to vending machines following the Smiler incident.

I don't think Nemesis ever gets a long enough queue to really need mid-queue refreshments. Better to put the effort into having the other nearby kiosks and shops open.
 

JAperson

TS Member
Bring back the queue line round the top of the pit I say, if only just to let me walk it once more. I vaguely remember it from when Nemesis first opened and I'd love to walk it again.
Id love to walk it but I presume its unsafe and they can't use it because of fast track. Perhaps one day we'll see it in action again although I imagine it rarely got used with the way nemesis absolutely eats people l.
 

Skyscraper

TS Member
Favourite Ride
Nemesis
It's great to see that they opened the section that passes the top of the lift hill last year to aid social distancing and have kept it open this year. Finally got to walk it back in May and perfectly timed it as I saw a train crest the lift when walking past! :)
 

JAperson

TS Member
It's great to see that they opened the section that passes the top of the lift hill last year to aid social distancing and have kept it open this year.. Finally got to walk it back in May and perfectly timed it as I saw a train crest the lift when walking past! :)
Yes it's been open and I hope they keep it open for a while yet. Interestingly it does seem that there's a cattle pen behind this as well so nemesis at one point had masses of queue line. Was it all every really used consistently?
 

jon81uk

TS Member
Yes it's been open and I hope they keep it open for a while yet. Interestingly it does seem that there's a cattle pen behind this as well so nemesis at one point had masses of queue line. Was it all every really used consistently?
Most of the Sub Terra queue line was also once Nemesis queue, it originally could cross the backstage gate and use the Sub Terra area.
 

Matt.GC

TS Member
Yes it's been open and I hope they keep it open for a while yet. Interestingly it does seem that there's a cattle pen behind this as well so nemesis at one point had masses of queue line. Was it all every really used consistently?
I remember queueing through all of that in the 90's and round the top of the pit. I queued around 3 hours for it opening year.

It's so long ago now, I can only remember bits like seeing the loop from a different angle. There wasn't much vegetation around then either as the pit was fresher and newer so most places you where in the queue you could have a clear view of the coaster, the monster and the pit. The atmosphere around the ride was fantastic, bearing in mind you had immature trees that made everything feel more open and brighter and freshly blasted rock free from weeds etc with red water running down into the pit. You could see the bus and the theming around the turnaround as well as you got closer to them then as the queue descended past the maintenance shed towards the station.

Despite its throughput, Nemesis had long queues right into the 2000's even after Air and Oblivion opened. The queue lines were shortened of course like they are on every coaster, I think the NST bit and the top of the pit were the first to go? The current setup they've had this season was used used less and less but I think if my memory serves me right the bit that goes up towards the bus and back down by the maintenance shed (as an extension to its current setup where it turns left from the stairs and goes straight onto the station) was still in regular use in the 2000's or possibly even later?
 

JAperson

TS Member
I remember queueing through all of that in the 90's and round the top of the pit. I queued around 3 hours for it opening year.

It's so long ago now, I can only remember bits like seeing the loop from a different angle. There wasn't much vegetation around then either as the pit was fresher and newer so most places you where in the queue you could have a clear view of the coaster, the monster and the pit. The atmosphere around the ride was fantastic, bearing in mind you had immature trees that made everything feel more open and brighter and freshly blasted rock free from weeds etc with red water running down into the pit. You could see the bus and the theming around the turnaround as well as you got closer to them then as the queue descended past the maintenance shed towards the station.

Despite its throughput, Nemesis had long queues right into the 2000's even after Air and Oblivion opened. The queue lines were shortened of course like they are on every coaster, I think the NST bit and the top of the pit were the first to go? The current setup they've had this season was used used less and less but I think if my memory serves me right the bit that goes up towards the bus and back down by the maintenance shed (as an extension to its current setup where it turns left from the stairs and goes straight onto the station) was still in regular use in the 2000's or possibly even later?
I think the bit seen in this video at 1:04 hasn't been used since fast-track was created:
The extended queueline as it is now seems to be used in this video in 2011:

Does anyone know of a video that walks through the whole queue line including all the old extension parts that are now completed closed?
 
Top