Poland-ia (Legendia | Energylandia) 15/16th Sept 18

Discussion in 'Your Trip Reports and Plans' started by Danny, 21st Sep 2018.

  1. Danny

    Danny TPWW's no.1 Fan

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    I've had very little desire to visit Poland over the duration of my lifespan thus far. Whilst there's certainly no shortage of things to do across the country, there has never been a particular draw on a certain level to attract me there. This is also a heightened statement when it comes to the theme park perspective, because Poland has never had any form of serious offering for us enthusiasts. Until now.

    Silesian Amusement Park opened in Chorzow back in 1959; plenty of time therefore to develop a history and make a mark on Poland's amusement/theme park game. Yet despite its timely existence, I'd never heard of this particular park and I'm also willing to bet there will be many other users on this forum in the same boat. You may however come to recognise it by the modern name of 'Legendia Śląskie Wesołe Miasteczko, AKA "Legendia".

    Nestled in the location of a central park, Legendia follows the typical layout of a circular theme park surrounding a lake. Getting lost here is a virtually impossible task and makes navigating by landmark attractions incredibly easily.

    The first notable aspect to Legendia is the free parking, situated round to the side of the park on a small slither of land. Upon first impression the size and capacity of the car park doesn't appear to be overly large. This however wasn't to be an issue for our visit due to noticeable lack of cars using it....

    Having landed at the beginning of the afternoon, we arrived at Legendia at around 13:00pm with the park open until 20:00pm that evening, a ten-hour operational day which for us had been shortened to seven. Between us were no expectations of what we were set to face off against regarding queue times, operations and the usual aspects we tend to brace for in uncharted theme park territory on the continent.

    The entirety of the park can be observed from the end of the entrance area, stretching out and around the lake. Once at the end of the charming entrance however, the majority of Legendia's theme park-esque grandeur runs out of steam.

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    Legendia’s ride portfolio consists mainly of attractions dressed in fairground attire, inflicting a dampener on its image which bears somewhat of a resemblance to Toverland before the latter went in pursuit of Efteling down a cooperate alleyway.

    In between the clusters of fairy lights and warped fairground cartoon panelled walls are large, open green spaces. Well-tended gardens that attempt to impose a sense of charm against the lake backdrop are separated by the occasional ride which has been subjected to a greater scope of theming, including the likes of Diamond River, Dragon Riders and to some form of extent, Scary Toy Factory.

    The recent themed efforts that Legendia have made are certainly not to turn one’s nose up at. Their new for 2018 dark ride ‘Bazyliszek’ is still bathed in a new smell, with the polished queue line floor still glistening. The queue line theming has been well presented to demonstrate a sense of age, particularly the giant padlocks on the doors and some more intricate relic items. There’s almost a whiff of some basic Efteling touches inside, whilst the ride itself has also been carried out to a similar standard. A basic cable-guided shoot ‘em up that is far from offensive as you pass from screen to screen through some well attempted efforts at themed scenery. It’s certainly not the best dark on the planet, however given the relatively low scale of dark rides in Poland, it’s sets a great standard for future dark rides in the country.

    One rather bizarre attempt from the park is ‘Dream Flight Airlines’. Imagine Blackpool’s Flying Machines concept taken by a child, chewed up then vomited back out in a colourful fashion. Oh, and don’t forget the vehement propellers attached to the front of each aircraft either. The build quality of this attraction feels very in-house compared to the other rides throughout the park, particularly with the number of uneven wall panels, missing rivets and the bog-standard car seatbelt arrangement. Yes against all odds, this ride runs circles (in a clockwise direction mind you) around Flying Machines due to its much lengthier ride cycle and far more intense swing out. The only issue with the ride is due to having side mounted guide wheels as opposed to just simply scraping along the platform, it does take quite a significant amount of time to stop…

    We opted to miss out on Dragon Riders having seen the damage it caused the previous week to @Hils. In fact it also transpired we weren’t the only ones electing to avoid it all costs, as over the duration of our visit we only saw the ride cycle once. For anyone who hasn’t seen this ridiculous flat ride, just picture yourself as a hamster running in a wheel, then stopping and allowing your shoulders to scrape along against the momentum. Hideous.

    One of the most anticipated aspects of Legendia for me was the chance to ride Tornado; a ride from my youthful visits to American Adventure that I had sadly missed out on due to my shear hatred of roller coasters back in the day. Sadly, it was not to be as the ride looked more than just closed, but perhaps condemned. Clearly when it was installed at Legendia it held a place as the park’s premier thrill roller coaster. Dependant on the level of investment over the next few years however, its future could possibly be unclear due to the fact a much more recent addition has significantly kicked it down and out for the count (more on that later….)

    Two of the other roller coasters the park had to offer on the other hand certainly weren’t intending on spiting us this trip. Not only were they very much open, but they also had next to no queues for them either. Perhaps a blessing, as queuing for the following experiences would have been a miserable condition to riding them.

    We first rode Scary Toys Factory, a cartoonish themed façade hiding a bog-standard Zyklon layout. Further pieces of cartoonish toy theming are scattered in any available pocket of ride area that isn’t shrouded in the plentiful pink support structure, perhaps to actually put off its desire target audience from the forthcoming horrific encounter. For the most part, Scary Toys Factory is relatively inoffensive. Slow, uneventful turns accompanied by mediocre drops are lulling senses of false security, as the ride’s finale includes a ridiculously harsh and unannounced brake which will damage some part of your body regardless of how hard you attempt to brace.

    Then there’s the smaller distorted twin in the form of Dream Hunter’s Society. Once again, a standard layout hidden behind a whacky and colourful façade. This ride on the other hand whilst appearing to be the smaller and tamer version of the two is actually the complete opposite. The drops are far more intense, catching you by surprise with their tight entry transitions. Despite the better ride however, Dream Hunter’s Society suffers the same finale as its twin, attempting to break some part of your body on its final brake run before returning the remaining pieces of you back to the station.

    One ride the four of us found ourselves enjoying more than we anticipated is ‘Giant Water Pump’. A contradictory name as the ride is in fact a tiny swinging ride that packs a much larger punch. The extended ride duration was also a welcome factor, and once again made all the better by the fact we were able to walk straight onto it.

    Also in this neck of the woods of Legendia is the park’s main water attraction, Diamond River. We left this until the peak of temperature in the day to ensure we dried off quickly, having no idea on the levels of wetness that the ride would throw at us. Wetness however is the least of the worries for this ride.

    I concluded that Diamond River is the non-launched, water equivalent of Furious Baco. Whilst the majority of the layout consists of trundling around, the two drops are jarred by discomforting back smashing; the first significantly worse than the second. Something just doesn’t seem to sit right, either the profiling of the drops or indeed the boats themselves. Irrespective of the cause, the result is a ride that delivers acceptable levels of wetness, but by no means any acceptable levels of enjoyment.

    With Legendia being so quiet on the whole, our day which we believed was a little on the short side was beginning to become tedious when it came to time. Several leisurely rest stops were had throughout the day, including a return trip to the car to deposit some belongings which turned out to be the biggest faff of the day. Normally when leaving a theme park, you either expect to retain your admission ticket or get a hand stamp from the entrance host and are able to return at any time you want. Legendia on the other hand don’t appear to believe in convenience when it comes to exiting and re-entering the park and insist on making their method as stupid as possible.

    Before leaving the park, you must go to guest services to request a permission slip in order to leave and come back; similar to wanting to go the toilet in secondary school. Waiting for said permission slip turned out to be the longest we had to wait for anything in the park across the entire day, and even when you are able to claim the permission slip, the time you spend outside the park is limited. To 15 minutes.

    Should 15 minutes pass and you haven’t returned to the park, I suspect you are faced with the prospect of having to buy another ticket. We therefore didn’t take any chances of exploring the surrounding area of the park, hot footed it to the car and back and re-entered the park.

    Upon re-entering, our long wait began in order for daylight to turn to night in order to pick up some night rides. We opted to have a go on the ‘Magical Lake Taxi’, a rent-a-row boat on the main lake. 30 minutes for free, and a small charge for anytime after that. Frustratingly the process to gain access to these boats appeared to be more difficult than passing through border control as we had done earlier, as a passport had to be present in order to rent one. With our passports obviously in the car, and our expired permission slip meaning we were unable to go and retrieve them, we were almost forced to give up on this front. Thankfully Al had a copy of his passport on his phone, which the host seemed to reluctantly accept.

    A 100,000 word disclaimer later lead to perhaps the most hilarious and nerve wracking experience of the entire trip. We opted to row straight over to the opposite side of the lake, snap some photos and leisurely sail back rather than attempt to row a complete lap. The return journey saw the sky beginning to turn gold, signalling the beginning of sunset and the inevitable turn to dusk and night time.

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    On the face of it, we actually missed over half the rides and attractions Legendia had to offer throughout our stay. Queue times were of course irrelevant as there simply weren’t any. Our stop for food and a beer or two in Obreza Lecha hardly ate into any of our time, and we even spent a good chunk designing..ahem.. artwork…. In the sandpit. The truth is on the most part, Legendia’s ride portfolio isn’t really tempting or attractive. It lacks any form of major headlining rides to make you desperately want to soak up time repeating them. The atmosphere was seemingly dull, with little to no energy or vibes emitting from anywhere, heightened by the apparent ride graveyard of fairground rides of the past which can be seen from Dream Flight Airlines. The musical scores throughout the park are simply ripped from major film franchises, such as Pirates of the Caribbean, Transformers and the Marvel Cinematic Universe, despite the fact the park clearly has the look and feel they should be either composing it themselves or getting IMAscore in to sort something out for them.

    The intentions and foundations for Legendia to be a great theme park are there, yet in its current state there’s almost a Lightwater Valley-esque feel to the place. The infrastructure has been accounted for, and the park are openly advertising what’s to come over the next two years. Despite all this, there isn’t really anything to give Legenda the benefit of the doubt to return for. The guest numbers from our visit were concerning, and as we had our final ride at 7:55pm, looking out across the lake revealed there were simply no guests left. As soon as I stepped through the gates at around 8:10pm, they simply closed behind me.

    I really do want Legendia to succeed. It benefits from a beautiful location and easy to navigate layout. The location is easily accessible from all major surrounding cities, with trams frequently passing by the entrance.

    There’s also another reason I want Legendia to succeed. In the seven hours we were there, I discovered my new second favourite roller coaster on the planet.

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    For the cost of Nemesis Sub Terra and all its failings, Legendia have managed to build Lech Coaster, a Bermuda Blitz model from Vekoma. Lech was easily the most anticipated roller coaster of the park and is also only just over a year old. In the weeks leading up to visiting Legendia, I begged myself not to fall into the same trap as I had done with Os’Iris the previous month; expecting what appeared to be a great coaster on paper fail to live up to expectations.

    I proactively avoided reading any reviews of Lech on the internet, whilst also avoiding catching a glimpse of what any of the group who had visited the previous weekend had to say about it. I buried the POV I had watched from weeks before to ensure I rode Lech with a totally open mind.

    Lech is one of the more deeply themed attractions at Legendia. The entirety of its queue line is kept within the boundaries of its layout, offering a great view regardless of where you are standing. Needless to say, we spent very little time queuing for Lech at any point of the day, which also meant bypassing the themed pre-show at the bottom of the station building. We did attempt to stop and watch it on one of our later goes, but the lack of queue line simply tore us away before we could become too invested.

    Upon arriving on the station platform for the first time, the train was already ¼ loaded and the airgates still open. Scrapping any concept of waiting for select rows, we leaped at the chance to walk straight on and get sat down.

    Lech ran one train for the duration of our visit, but that’s all it needed. Throughout the entire day, Lech only dispatched 94 trains. Even if you were to fill each train which was simply not the case, that meant that Lech would have only cycled through 1880 individual guests.

    So, what about the ride itself? Well…

    Lech is one of the biggest surprises I’ve ever had the pleasure of enjoying on a roller coaster. It’s the pinnacle statement from Vekoma that their new track and trains are leagues ahead of their previous efforts. Lech makes The Swarm feel like a cheap, Pinfari rattle trap. The entire ride is smoother than silk, traversing its layout like an ice skater gliding across black ice with a degree of courage, ferocity but also a dash of grace as well. It pulls you down its first drop with a great deal of airtime, especially towards the back, before blitzing straight into the sidewinder.

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    I’m yet to ride Intimidator 305, but Lech attempts to pull a serious punch in the grey out competition after exiting its first inversion, elegantly turning over the lake before pulling you through a roll directly over the station roof. The transition is so smooth you simply can’t feel it occurring, almost as if being inverted by magic. The following sections right up to the on-ride photo are carried out addictive speed and demonstrates no signs of stopping, effortlessly tumbling you through the final corkscrew with a delightful decorum.

    Even after this, Lech still refuses to lose any steam, traversing an outward banked dive and a series of sweeping turns back to the brake run. Even the ending is done with such smoothness that it’s difficult to comprehend it just happened.

    Lech is everything a great roller coaster should be. The pacing is consistent and continuous, keeping you hooked high on its ecstasy as it shows you what Vekoma’s modern engineering is capable of. An airtime machine combined with inversions that have been seemingly crafted by mythical gods of the roller coaster world, all whilst doing so in a quiet and humble manner. It doesn’t look intimidating, nor does it look timid. Lech strikes the finest palette taste for roller coasters; a catalyst for some of the best things you could ask for on a coaster. The trains are comfortable and well built. Whilst there is room for improvement in perhaps the unnecessary need for the vests, they’re hardly offensive when compared to those of B&M’s wing coasters, and the theming shows that Legendia have the ability to leave their fairground heritage in the past and continue to craft well designed experiences.

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    It is truly staggering to think that the cost of such a grand piece of design is so little, and it excitedly gives you a glimpse into what parks like Drayton, Lightwater, Flamingo Land and heck, even Paulton’s Park could pull off by investing in this hardware.

    Of the two headlining coasters for the trip, Lech romps ahead by a country mile, and then some. It restores faith that Legendia have the potential to go in the direction they not only need to but deserve to. It demonstrates that Vekoma aren’t just capable of pulling off great projects for Disney either, but also for the smaller parks that dare to dream.

    I may not have been completely bowled over by Legendia, but one thing is for sure. Lech Coaster alone is enough a reason to return or even simply visit for the first time.

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    Last edited: 21st Sep 2018
    Cheese, CGM, Alsty and 12 others like this.
    Posted 21st Sep 2018
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  2. Matt N

    Matt N TowersStreet Member

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    Great report, Danny! Your comment about the ride's smoothness compared to Swarm is certainly encouraging for Vekoma's future projects, as The Swarm is among the smoothest coasters I've ever ridden!

    I look forward to the part about Energylandia!
     
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    Posted 21st Sep 2018
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  3. RicketyCricket

    RicketyCricket TowersStreet Member

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    Cheaper than Sub Terra ffs.

    I must admit the restraints put me off Lech coaster, but all I've ever heard is overwhelmingly positive feedback. I seem to have a long torso and my shoulders get a battering on the likes of Rita.

    Are Lech's restraints designed to kind of hover above the shoulders and not tighten?
     
    Posted 23rd Sep 2018
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  4. Danny

    Danny TPWW's no.1 Fan

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    The restraints really aren't that offensive; I can see why some are opposed to them however as there really is no need for the vests.

    It depends on the shape and size of your shoulders, I'm quite slim and tall so I found they hugged the front but didn't come anywhere near the top. They remain slack throughout the ride however and do not tighten, so the only thing to look out for are any staff that appear to be pushers rather than pullers.
     
    Last edited: 23rd Sep 2018
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    Posted 23rd Sep 2018
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  5. Matt Creek

    Matt Creek TowersStreet Member

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    Despite only having one (maybe two) standout rides, Legendia is definitely a park that interests me and I might be in the minority that finds the place so far more appealing than Energylandia (in a number of respects).

    Here’s hoping the park can become successful and bring in more high quality additions.

    Apparently the Tornado coaster will be receiving a steampunk theme in 2019, so there is still some hope left for the old Twin Looper.
     
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    Posted 25th Sep 2018
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  6. Danny

    Danny TPWW's no.1 Fan

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    Without going into too much detail before posting the Energylandia section of my report, I agree with you in preferring Legendia. Quality over quantity speaks volumes.
     
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  7. deymos87

    deymos87 TowersStreet Member

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    First of all, thank You for your review, it's always great fun for me to know how the guests from abroad, which has big experience in theme parks are seeing our first few parks. I can't wait for your opinion about Energylandia.

    Speaking about Legendia, in our polish coaster community there is a big sentiment for this park - for years it was only one place which we could call a "theme park" in whole country. A lot of polish people remember this park from childhood. Therefore, our community can forgive Legendia a lot, but I'm not one of those people :)

    Energylandia and Legendia gone two opposite ways - and which way is better adjusted for customers here in Poland is rather clear - the crowds in Energylandia and sad emptiness of Legendia says it all. Here in Poland we had enough cheap attractions, old and bought from second hand market - we wanted maybe smaller, but brand new park and attractions. According to that, whole rebranding of the Śląskie Wesołe Miasteczko and ambitious plans of refurbish old rides were bad decision from business point of view. And you can see, that those rides are some kind of antic and sometimes dangerous - no matter how many buckets of new paint and cardboard sets you will throw at them. For example, Dream Flight Airlines are oldest ride in the park, coming from 60ts, and it's original polish construction so it has been made by company which had no experience in rides at all. You've got lucky that you've seen the new sittings there, because old ones were taken from old stadium in Chorzów.. :( There were numerous crashes and injuries on old rides, including Tornado and one of the old Pinifaris. And You can be sure of one thing - if same crashes happened on Energylandia, our community would ate them for breakfast.

    Location of Legendia is splendid, much more appealing than Energylandia which is builded in literally flat corn field, but approach of owners seems not so good and I'm afraid of future of this park, because you can clearly see that one great coaster (Lech) is not enough for customers. They've waited for crowds at the opening in 2017, but interest was clearly below expectations. All people are aware that there is lot of old rides there.
     
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    Posted 28th Sep 2018
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  8. Danny

    Danny TPWW's no.1 Fan

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    Energylandia is in some ways the polar opposite to Legendia. Whilst Legendia is nestled as a beautifully presented central city park, Energylandia actually balances on a similar scope to Alton Towers. Tucked out of the way of the main population with only a handful of small villages surrounding it, access to Energylandia is mainly via winding roads through countryside and woodland.

    Our journey from Krakow to Energylandia only took us on the main motorway out of the city, whilst the rest of the journey was primarily conducted on these twsting roads. The similarities to Towers don’t just fall to its location however, but also the approach. Whilst of course the park can be seen from some distance courtesy of its new headlining hyper coaster, the traffic tends to tailback for a good few miles. We estimated our distance to the park from the back of the traffic when we reached it would have been the equivalent of Denstone to Towers; thankfully without the agonizing wait that comes with it.

    The car parking staff at Energylandia demonstrated great efficiency and balance when it came to minimisng the traffic queue to get into the park, and I found myself parking the car much quicker than we’d anticipated.

    Compared to the previous day’s guest figures at Legendia, it soon became very apparent that was a lucky luxury given the number of guests arriving en-mass to the Zator based theme park. Despite the numbers however, the opening times Energylandia advertised weren’t as generous as Legendia, opting for a 10:00 – 18:00 day instead.

    The biggest comparisons between the two parks start as soon as you reach the entrance plaza. There’s a lack of fizz or zest in its corporateesque entrance arch, not aided in the slightest by the relatively bland logo. On the other side of the coin however were the efficient ticket operations, and even with a toilet stop we were in the park in less than ten minutes, greeted by pleasantly amicable entrance hosts.

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    Once inside, it becomes almost immediately apparent exactly what Energylandia is. A labyrinth of government funded investment, with every knook and cranny rammed with some sort of ride or attraction regardless of quality. Whilst attempts have been made to theme the majority of individual attractions, there’s no area consistency for the most part which leads to a horrific mash of clashing themes. An Egyptian pyramid parked next to a Mars landscape. A dragon cave nestled across a tiny, virtually dried up concrete lake from a modern day grand prix pit stop. If anything, Energylandia almost conveys itself as a little too overwhelming.

    Given its four-year lifespan thus far, it’s certainly impressive just how much the park has added in the time frame. Energylandia is already home to 12 roller coasters of varying shapes and sizes, and they’ve made it very clear that a RMC, a tilt coaster and a double launch coaster are all on the cards in the next few years.

    With the number of guests present on park mixed with the sheer scale of ride content, it became all too clear that we were going to struggle to fit everything in, even if we were to do so intensively with very little time for resting.

    At around 15:00pm, the park announced a 90 minute extension taking the close up to 19:30, meaning a dark ride or two was possible, but still not really enough time for us to comfortably tick everything off the list.

    So without further ado, let’s take a look at Energylandia’s extensive offering and what we got up to across our day:

    Speed

    Given that Legendia had spited us the previous day with only three of the four coasters available, it meant that my 200th credit was no longer simply a case of strolling into the park and claiming its new headlining hyper as the milestone number. With the temperatures already soaring in the early hours, we opted to tackle some water-based attractions to start with, commencing with the first new roller coaster Energylandia installed this year.

    After a faffy locker situation for storing baggage, Speed gave us the perfect insight into what to expect from the rest of our day at Energylandia. An impressive stroke of luck when spinning the Intamin wheel of fortune meant that their new water coaster ft Divertical’s lift mechanism opened on time without a hitch. Mercifully, the Polish appear to have been gifted something that many of the British theme parks lack, known as ‘common sense’. With the temperatures continuing to climb throughout the day, the majority of ride queue lines were graced with parasols which we first encountered in Speed’s queue line. We also discovered another recurring theme during our 20-minute wait; the theming build quality.

    Given Speed has been open for less than a year, you’d be forgiven for mistaking that the queue line has been around for over a decade. The rock work is scruffy, paint flaking, and various large holes filled in with no attempt to hide the ugly additions. The ride’s soundtrack unimaginatively consists of a CD from the Pirates of the Caribbean series, whilst the station building is an oversized wooden shed. There’s nothing thematically or atmospherically intriguing about the ride, heightened by its uninspired name.

    Then there’s the ride itself. Rather than taking like a duck to water, each ride boat lumbers out of the station and attempts to self-induce a migraine by repeatedly butting the trough as it meanders to the lift. Looks can certainly be deceiving with the height, as once at the top it feels much higher than the contraption looks from the ground.

    The first drop should have been great potential for Speed; a steep swooping dive that would have made up for the abysmal patching of the queue line and rather unpleasant trip to the lift. Instead, inspiration appears to have been sought from The Big One’s triangle hill, with a set angle of descent the whole way down. The rest of the layout whilst inoffensive, fails to strike any chords of mild excitement or above, with a bland straight section where a series of block brakes clearly should have been. The finale splashdown seemed to vary between boats, with some guests returning relatively dry whilst we came off with a considerable wetting; perhaps just beyond the realms of acceptable wetness.

    The amount of space consumed to deliver Speed is a huge waste of potential. The ride on the whole teeters dangerously on the edge of being boring, but certainly ticks the box of being bland. It’s a colossal eyesore, and almost certainly a ‘buy one, get one half price’ deal they struck with Intamin for this year.


    Energus

    A perky Vekoma family coaster that benefits from a surprisingly fun and well-paced layout. In fact Vekoma appear to be so proud of it, they’ve installed a large corporate banner that covers a good portion of one of the station walls. There’s a whopping great issue with the overall experience for Energus however, and that comes in the form of the queue line. The ride tips the calendar at just over three years old, yet the state of the theming in the queue is atrocious. Gaping holes in the wall reveal just how poor the build quality is, and this is something that is reflected across many areas of the park. Even the team at MMM would probably shiver at the shocking sight of it.

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    @BigAl demonstrating Energus' theming quality.

    Frutti Loop Coaster

    Situated next to Energus, this SBF Visa manufactured Big Apple (minus the actual apple) actually benefits from some of the cheap quality theming Energylandia seem to rely on. Other than the glaring concrete base it’s parked on, Frutti Loop is smothered in enough theming to hide most of the ugly supports that these coasters are cursed with. Then whether you see it as a bonus or a curse, an additional third lap was also bestowed upon us just to make that ten-minute queue feel somewhat worth it.

    Mars

    Another coaster plucked from the SBF Visa catalog. Unlike Frutti Loop however, Mars’ theming is almost too tacky to be taken seriously. Given the ride’s theming (and also station building) has been added to over time, it’s almost as if the coaster has been made to look worse. As for the ride experience? It’s laughable. There’s a jarring jolt ¾ of the way through the layout, and the fact it has to rely on gravity to roll back from the lift hill onto the station rather than using a brake system is the crown on how crap this ride is. Bring. In. The. Bulldozers.

    Circus Coaster

    Yes we did ride this. Even @John . Given the park should be more ashamed of having one rather than us nabbing front and back rows, this was a positively and secretly hilarious ride. A bog standard Go Gator with an incredibly enthusiastic operator. Enough said.

    Viking Roller Coaster

    The barrel has been well and truly scraped from the SBF portfolio with this god-awful spinner. Pointless OTSR’s ruin what would have been a harmless, bog standard spinning wild mouse. An unpleasant ride bestowed with perhaps one of the better quality themed stations and a totally covered queue line. I think I’ll be passing on this next time.

    Right then, let’s talk about some of the more decent coasters shall we?

    Boomerang

    This unconventional family boomerang layout has the potential to be a great all round experience, tarnished only by the queue line and lack of imaginative name. Once inside the actual ride area, it becomes apparent the ride has a hidden horror/vampire theme that is difficult to perceive from the outside. The station is well-themed with some typical haunted house props, whilst the overall idea and concept of the ride area has been asserted. However, it’s all too obvious that some of the exterior theming, particularly in the queue line, was either rushed or they simply couldn’t be arsed to complete it. Much of the queue line fencing has been unfinished in terms of painting, sharing the same bland fading white paint scheme. All it needs is a dash of love and a more inspired ride name and Boomerang would be a fantastic family centric ride for Energylandia.

    Formula

    Given our hugely enjoyable experience with Vekoma’s newer coaster manufacturing standards the previous day with Lech, our anticipation for this park’s launched coaster had undeniably been raised. The queue line has been blatantly altered to pass around one of the tunneled corners of the ride, which left us exposed for a considerable amount of time to the scorching mid-afternoon heat. Of all the ride’s queues throughout the day, Formula’s was perhaps the most unpleasant. Entertainment was however provided in the crashing of a rider’s phone into the ride area. Cue anxious glances to see if any ride engineer was going to be stepping into the ride area to retrieve it however…

    [​IMG]

    Despite the awful queue, Formula offers exactly the sort of ride we had expected as the aftermath of Lech. The launch is balanced in between the graceful pace of Mack megacoasters and the balls-to-wall aggression of Intamin’s designs. What then follows on is a series of tightly woven together turns and inversions iced with Vekoma’s glass smooth track profiling. The small and erratic nature of the layout is just enough to counter the silky ride feel which would detract from the theme and experience of the overall grand prix style attraction. Sadly, we only got to experience Formula once on our visit, but the one ride was enough to assert it as one of the best rides of the two parks.

    Dragon

    Another one of Vekoma’s offerings at the park in the form of a suspended family coaster, but yet another ride suffering from the side of Energylandia’s tacky theming. The entire queue line is a joke, with loose wooden fence posts and an entire hole ridden mountain that makes Icon’s shoebox station feel at home in a Disney park. In fact, Dragon’s theming is a monstrous insult to the actual ride itself; a well-paced coaster with a surprisingly intense first helix, that manages to not outstay its welcome.

    [​IMG]
    @CGM demonstrating the poor theming in Dragon's queue line.

    Mayan

    Energylandia’s Vekoma SLC. Yep, the notorious off-the-shelf suspended looping coaster which ranges in degrees of pain depending on park and age, right down to the sheer torture of El Condor. On first inspection, Mayan is virtually the same as all the others with one exception.

    The colour scheme.

    With supports and track selected from the same colour palette, the red/pink/orange mixture thrown into a blender and spurted onto the ride structure is hideous. The flat, switchback queue line is tedious, and the station building quality fails to capture the essence and grandeur of Mayan architecture.

    So overall, a crap installment?

    Thankfully, Mayan has a saving grace trick up its sleeves that makes it leagues ahead of every other SLC that Vekoma have installed. The trains.

    Mercifully, Mayan’s trains feature Vekoma’s newer restraint design, meaning there’s no ear bleeding bashing as the ride shuffles around its layout. The ride experience itself is far from perfect, as the jolts and shuffles can still be felt as the train navigates the all too familiar elements. Courtesy of the restraints however, the absorptions from said niggles are taken primarily by the train, rather than then being siphoned into your body.

    Mayan is to an extent enjoyable, exactly what a SLC should be. If all current SLC owners were to convert the restraints, then the difference would be hugely noticeable. The layout was never going to ensure that the design would venture anywhere near world’s greatest territory, but the new restraints make all the difference. Whilst the likes of Limit, El Condor, Vampire and the other SLC’s I’ve ridden hover in the worst to atrocious area of the roller coasters I’ve ridden, Mayan is on the complete opposite end of the scale. Had it not dropped down to one train operation towards the end of the day, a re-ride would have very much occurred.

    [​IMG]

    Due to timings and a consistent lengthy queue line throughout the day, we missed out on the final coaster in SBF’s fling with Energylandia in the form of Happi Loops. If I was that desperate to experience it however, I’m sure I’d have popped into Canon Hill Park in Birmingham to experience their Fun World clone by now, so it’s certainly something I won’t lose sleep over any time soon.

    Other rides we experienced during our time at Energylandia include Jungle Adventure, one of the two rapids rides in the park. Situated by Speed, this ride is paradoxical of its namesake. I’m not entirely sure Energylandia are aware of what a jungle entails, but an un-themed trough slotted into cut outs of astroturf and concrete is far from the actual appearance of a jungle. The ride’s water reservoir is also an eye sore, a huge square dig out covered in tarp with no attempt to hide or theme it.

    [​IMG]

    Monster Attack is a typical dark ride built on a shoe string budget. No amount of UV paint or smoke machines can hide the true tacky nature of this ride. Enough said.

    As we left Energylandia, I found it difficult to truly sum up my thoughts and ultimate opinion. It’s only writing this report almost two weeks later that I can finally draw my conclusions and reflect upon it.

    It’s all fine and dandy hearing that the government are throwing money at the park left right and centre. But if you were to take a step back, take the consistent and copious amount of investing out and stretch it out across an average park’s lifespan thus far, the picture becomes a warped and quite scary image.

    The park’s huge government budget has been spent entirely incorrectly. It’s been used all at once to bring in a quantity of attractions. A large quantity of cheap, middle to bottom of the range hardware and shoddy theming. Where money has been spent more on ride hardware, theming has been made at the expense and a last resort.

    Furthermore, there has been a lack of forward planning with Energylandia. Having been plonked down hastily to get everything open as quickly as possible, infrastructure changes over the years are still all too visible throughout the park. There are several concrete bases that used to house rides or structures that have seen its occupants removed or relocated, whilst the base has been left to be covered with chairs and tables. Holes in the pathways where temporary queue line fencing used to exist are yet to be covered up.

    The park is having a huge identity crisis. More permanent rides and structures are placed surrounding a hefty littering of cheap, fairground tat attractions and stalls. The park simply can’t benefit from an atmosphere because there are too many voices trying to be heard at once, ranging from the cheap and the poor of the attractions through to the upper class and wealthier products. There’s a frustrating lack of consistency across Energylandia, topped with aspects that make this relatively new theme park look old and tired, as if it belongs at a retirement home.

    Even Hyperion hasn’t been able to scythe through the mixed bag to make a bold and dramatic statement. In fact, it almost feels as if it doesn’t belong at the park. The sleek and cutting edge space theme has whiffs of Disney about it. Only slight hints, nothing overly the top, but Hyperion does have a sense of drama about it that no other ride at Energylandia can muster.

    Its location tucked away in a corner by the entrance of the park also adds emphasis that the ride doesn’t belong at the park, as if it knows this by heart and is attempting to flee into the surrounding Polish cornfields. The queue line layout is designed to fit as many guests as possible into a very small space but is done in such a way that there’s plenty of room to breathe. The multi-story car park feel of climbing up into the heavens, before being treated to a view of the ride’s main layout as you descend back into the station is actually rather clever.

    Then there’s the rather bizarre batching method. Forget Karnan and Baron’s extravagant sequences, Hyperion certainly puts in a claim for perhaps the oddest method of embarking onto a coaster. Split into four segments, guests can opt for the front row (section 1), any unfilled spaces (section 2), or a free-for-all scrum to get anywhere other than a cheap seat (sections 3 and 4). This means to secure a back-row ride on Hyperion, you must be at the front of the turnstiles prior to boarding and be quick off the block to beat the next group parallel in the next section to you.

    [​IMG]

    This is exactly how our first ride on Hyperion occurred straight after Speed in the morning, claiming the new hyper coaster as my 200th credit. As with Lech, I convinced myself to remain as open as possible, watching as little footage of the ride and steering well clear of opinions and reviews.

    With a far right, back row seat and an incredibly loose lap bar, the swift climb up the lift hill was accompanied by an excited tingle of anticipation for what was about to unfold.

    [​IMG]

    With such a loose restraint, the first drop was a horrifying yet extraordinary experience. I may as well have rode a stand up coaster, as my seat proved to be utterly useless until the bottom of the first drop. An intense ecstasy powered rush that could never grow boring. That one song that no matter how many times you listen to it, still gives you goosebumps regardless of how long it’s been stuck on repeat.

    With a sensational first drop out of the way, the remainder of Hyperion’s layout just needed to be conducted with consistent pacing, air time and some snappy transitions to make for one hell of a coaster.

    Yet as soon as the first air time hill was passed, Hyperion appeared to summon inspiration out of thin air taken from a certain Spanish, launched Intamin relative. Furious Baco’s firm back bumping experience had somehow managed to soar from Salou up to Zator and take hold of my seat, repeatedly nudging me through the rest of Hyperion’s layout. There really are some awesome moments and transitions on Hyperion, yet the repeated back pounding was almost certainly detracting from the experience. To make matters worse is Hyperion’s finale.

    [​IMG]
    BRACE!

    At the back end of 2017, I had one of my most painful weather experiences on any roller coasters in the form of Silver Star in blinding hail. This would soon come to be a pleasant experience in comparison to how Hyperion finished me off. The water fountain ending pays great respect to its first six rows of riders. Should you opt for the back right seat however, not only is the speed of both water and coaster combined a severe matching, but it also made a noble effort at booting Speed and Jungle Adventure out of the water ride category.

    Soaked, a blistering pain in the face and a discomforted back were my personal findings from a first ride on Hyperion. Over 1,200 miles and a pit stop at Legendia all for this roller coaster had fallen to a degree of disappointment.

    However…

    First impressions aside, we gave Hyperion numerous re-rides throughout the day as I attempted to source and focus on the ride’s positives. The advertised 70 minute queue at its longest point during the day was only just tipping at over 40, whilst the remaining rides on Hyperion settled in between 15 – 30 minutes courtesy of its seemingly good operations.

    One noticeable aspect came on our front row ride, when we were made to wear goggles ala Red Force and Formula Rossa. This is quite possibly the biggest mistake on the ride, as it is clearly the rear of the train’s riders who should be bestowed with protective eyewear as the water feature fails to come anywhere close to those on the front row.

    Thankfully the back smashing from the first ride of the day faded to the back of my memory on the proceeding rides, a one off that failed to repeat or show itself throughout the rest of the day. The first drop on Hyperion remained just as sensational as the first time, even with the restraints tightened to different levels dependent on ride host. It warms up beautifully throughout the day. Our last ride at night was a testament to the ride’s warming up, with the water failing to catch us on the back row as we had long passed it before it had the chance to cascade back down and viciously strike again.

    There’s no doubting that Hyperion has the makings of a great roller coaster. It has all the great ingredients of a well-rounded hyper coaster, featuring the perfect amount and pops of air time, swift transitions and even a remarkably fun semi-inversion. After some brief comparisons with the group who visited both parks the week before us, it transpired they much preferred Hyperion than to how we did.

    Having ridden Lech the day before however, Hyperion became a case of “what could have been”. Even before Intamin were drafted in to build Hyperion, I’d become much more invested and interested with Vekoma’s potential layout that the park had showed off on social media. Lech was the strengthening statement that had Energylandia gone Dutch them rather than Swiss, Hyperion could very well have claimed a spot in my top 10.

    If however Hyperion is a sign of the ambition and quality of what Energylandia have in store for their next few coasters, then there is certainly exciting times ahead for the park. Irrespective of whether Energylandia is designed to attract local or foreign tourism, the sheer amount of interest from locals is almost certainly enough to sustain the park for the future. I’m sure I’ll inevitably be returning to Energylandia, but it certainly won’t be for ‘must do re-rides’ on Hyperion. Or any of their coasters in fact. Sure, the RMC, tilt and double launch coasters will be a great draw to bring me back, but that still isn’t the reason I’ll be returning.

    In fact, you’d be daft not to go to Energylandia. Why? Because there’s a quality over quantity-based theme park 56km away with one of the most surprising, smoothest and in my opinion, best roller coasters on the planet in the form of Lech. Therefore, it’d be almost rude not to pop by and check out this Zator based mash of theme park meets fun fair amongst Poland’s beautiful countryside.
     
    Last edited: 29th Sep 2018
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    Posted 29th Sep 2018
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  9. Matt N

    Matt N TowersStreet Member

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    Great report, Danny!

    Out of interest, was it the back smashing on Hyperion that kept it from your top 10, or were there other aspects too? Only asking because most people who ride Hyperion seem to have it way above Lech.
     
    Last edited: 29th Sep 2018
    Posted 29th Sep 2018
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  10. John

    John TowersStreet Member

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    Thanks for the report, I'm not going to do my own but I do have a few thoughts to add.

    I think you're being rather more generous about Legendia than I would be - Lech is an amazing coaster but the park as a whole is pretty dire. Feels very much like a public park that happens to have some rides in it for the most part. The ride line up is entirely reliant on Lech.

    Energylandia on the other hand is not a particularly pleasant park to be in, but is still the better park purely on account of how many rides it has (despite the majority of them being somewhere between mediocre and bad). Capacity of said rides is also an issue - there's a huge abundance of family coasters that can only run 1 train and Formula which has trains which are far too small, resulting in long waits. Even if they add higher capacity rides in the future, the waits for the Vekomas is likely to remain an issue (Mayan excepted, which was being operated fairly well).

    I was also surprised to see that Legendia had designed dedicated fasttrack entrances into several of their rides with absolutely no need for them, whilst Energylandia doesn't offer fastrack in any form - hopefully that remains the case as waiting for any of the 3 (count 'em) Vekoma family coasters is enough of a drag already.
     
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  11. Danny

    Danny TPWW's no.1 Fan

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    The back jolting only really effected the first ride. The watersplash finale makes a big statement as it just isn't needed, leaves you far wetter than you expect to be on something that isn't a dedicated water ride, and can also be quite painful. I also found that Hyperion doesn't quite deliver the buzz generated from the first drop, air time hill and dive drop throughout the rest of the ride.

    Lech on the other hand is consistent, smooth and carries its own weight from start to finish. If Lech was to have Hyperion's restraints, then it would be one hell of a coaster.

    I concur at the fact the park isn't everything it should be right now, but the underlying potential for Legendia seems far greater than Energylandia's I feel.

    I'm no fortune teller, but I strongly see Energylandia continuing to deliver on the poor build and theming quality, whereas Legendia finally seem to have found a good mark and can hopefully stick to it. If they were to receive the same funding as Energylandia, they would almost certainly spend it more wisely and transform the park around.

    I quite like the public park feel to it; it feels much more relaxed and charming rather than tacky fairground rides left right and centre in a mismatched manner.
     
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  12. Matt N

    Matt N TowersStreet Member

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    Ah right, so you mean that while it is a good coaster, it isn't as good for the rest of the ride as it is at the start. Thanks for the clarification @Danny!

    Also, the water splash looks... interesting. Kind of reminds me of Shambhala's.
     
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  13. CGM

    CGM TowersStreet Member

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    Like @John , I won't attempt a full trip report but I'll summarise my thoughts on the two parks and give reviews of a few of the standout rides.



    Legendia

    I generally agree with @Danny . Out of the two parks, this was a much nicer place to be, if a bit lacking in the ride department.

    It's clear that Legendia has ambition. They have recently revamped the park's infrastructure by adding a new highly themed entrance area and have replaced the old tarmac paths throughout the park with sweeping, perfectly leveled block-paved walkways .

    The recent themed areas have also been carried out to a high standard. The area around Lech is very atmospheric and there's no question of it falling apart after a few years with solid, timber framed buildings and hard-wearing theming.

    I was also impressed by the new dark ride which has a level of polish about it that you wouldn't normally expect from a park of this size. (This ride also has one of the most ambitiously long, yet empty queues I have ever seen).

    Basically, they've got the difficult stuff right and haven't shied away from spending money on Infrastructure, which is great. It's just a shame that their hard work hasn't been rewarded by an increase visitor numbers. The park was practically deserted for the entire day. I think the longest queue was for Dreamflight Airlines, on account of waiting for it to stop.

    I think the reason is pretty clear. It's true that they have made big ride investments such as Lech, Bazyliszek and a few large scale second-hand flat rides. However, when compared to the offering at nearby Energylandia, their ride lineup seems pretty lacking. They also have a lot of older rides which don't quite match the standard of their latest additions. (I thought Dreamflight Airlines was great though, it's like the Flying Machine's younger, more reckless sibling). The rides felt pretty thinly spread across the park too. We often found ourselves wandering round looking for things to do.

    I suppose the good news is that now that the heavy infrastructure investment has been made, the park can focus money on expanding and renewing the ride lineup. I hope they do because I do like Legendia and I think they deserve to do well.

    Onto a few of the rides:

    Lech Coaster


    It cannot be overstated how technically accomplished Vekoma have become. The smoothness of this coaster is otherworldly. It whips its way around the contorted nest of grey track with a fluid grace that makes B&M's efforts seem clumsy and ham-fisted. There have been signs of this new-found technical prowess in their family coasters for some years now. However, most of us in the UK have not had chance to ride a modern Vekoma thrill coaster and wow, how far they have come.

    Not only is Lech inconceivably smooth, it's also a genuinely fantastic coaster. From the twisting first drop which tears the train from beneath you, to the brakes, Lech is a cocktail of high Gs, powerful pops of airtime and high speed, whippy inversions. It's simply one of the most intense coasters on the continent.

    If you still think of Vekoma as the company that makes good family coasters but horrifically rough thrill coasters, a ride on Lech should put these ideas to bed. Vekoma is now at the sharp end of track shaping technology and should be considered a high quality manufacturer up there with B&M and Mack (we'll just ignore the fact they still offer the SLC).

    Perhaps the most amazing thing about Lech is that it's an off-the-shelf layout which parks can buy for around 4 million pounds. To me, this seems like the bargain of the century.

    Diamond River

    This was an absolutely appalling chute-the chute style ride that has a distinctly home-made feel about it, especially the restraint system which features one large sliding component that closes a bar on all rows simultaneously (like a giant, sliding prison cell door). It is activated by the ride operator manually connecting a compressor to a Heath Robinson collection of pneumatic components sticking out the front of each boat.

    As for the ride itself, you know it's a bad sign when the operator instructs you to brace yourself against the large area of padding at the front of each row during the drops. He was right to do so because the drops on Diamond River are about as refined as a car crash. At the time, I assumed this must be an old ride that had received (an admittedly very good) theming update. But no, as it turns out, this ride was only added a few years ago.

    Dragon Temple


    I have wanted to ride a Huss Rainbow for many years and was thrilled to finally track down an example of this increasingly rare flat. I expected the ride to have good airtime, and it did. What I didn't expect was the lateral forces that cause you to slide uncontrollably from side-to-side of your bench-like seat. This is fine if you share your 2-seater row with another rider as there's a limited distance you can move but as @BigAl found out, should you have a row to yourself, you will slide a good half meter in each direction as the gondola barrels round. Trying to hold on to the basically pointless restraint will not prevent this. I don't see this as a bad thing though, the ride is an absolute riot and had us laughing for the entire ride (largely at Al's plight).

    For hardcore flat ride fans, Legendia has recently acquired another rare Huss model: a Flic-Flac which has a reputation of being one of the most intense flats out there. None of us elected to ride it though, it looked a bit horrifically nauseating.



    Energylandia

    Energylandia is impressive in the sheer amount of stuff they've managed to build in such a short space of time. From an outside perspective, the amount of expensive ride hardware this young park is buying seems baffling. It brings to mind expensive failures such as Hard Rock Park and under performing White Elephants such as Terra Mitica and Parque Warner.

    However, having visited the park, this just isn't the case. Whilst Legendia was like a ghost town, Energylandia was packed to the rafters. The sheer number of people there absolutely justifies the massive ride investment. In fact, the prospect of a few more major coasters doesn't seem that ridiculous given how full the queues were.

    Unfortunately, the rapid expansion of the park means that it has the feeling of a project that's been very rushed.

    The layout hasn't had the time and planning it could have had. In fact, it's a bit of a mess. It's difficult to navigate and you find yourself squeezing down awkward corridors between rides or trapped in odd cul-de-sacs. There's a huge mish-mash of different themes that awkwardly bleed into each other and sight-lines appear to have barely been considered.

    Most of the theming appears to have been done in-house and features a large number of very garishly coloured, rough-looking fibreglass sculptures. Dragons in particular feature a lot around the park and don't seem to be restricted to just one themed area. As can be seen above, rockwork is flimsy and is already being picked apart where it can be reached.

    But it's not all bad, Hyperion's queue and the new entrance area are themed to a much higher standard and the quality of the major coasters does a lot to redeem the park. It is definitely a park that is worth visiting and will be even more so once the new coasters are added but don't expect it to be brimming with atmosphere.


    The rides:

    Hyperion

    I'll start by saying Hyperion is a really good ride. It ticks all of the boxes that you would expect from a giant hyper coaster. A fantastic first drop, sustained bouts of ejector airtime and a great sensation of speed. The ground-hugging mid portion of the ride features a few interesting interesting pops of airtime and quick transitions that throw you you out of your seat. It's also well paced. It never has the slightest hint of flagging and powers its way into the final brake run.

    However, for me there are a few things that hold it back from greatness. Firstly there is the problem of the water splash. The last hill is brilliant. It's the final blast of ejector airtime before hitting the brakes making for a fitting finale to the ride. Unfortunately, you can't enjoy it because you have to brace yourself for collision with the dense curtain of water droplets that will smash you painfully in the face whilst utterly soaking you.

    Secondly, roughness. For the most part, this wasn't a problem and certainly not in the central pairs of seats. But at certain points of the day, the "winged" outer seats suffered a bit from unpleasant Baco-esque roughness. This in no-way ruined the ride but it did detract from the experience somewhat.

    Finally, and perhaps this is being a little unfair, it feels like it's missing a bit of Intamin madness. As I said, Hyperion is a really good coaster. It's easily the best thing in the park. But the thing is, when Intamin build a gigantic new hyper, you sort of expect something spectacular, world beating even. As it is, the airtime is great but it never feels like it wants to send you into orbit, the high speed, low to the ground sections feel fast but also very controlled. The mad-looking turn around is fun but fairly forgettable. Overall, Hyperion is Intamin being very sensible. It's a very high quality coaster, but it is certainly not the European answer to Skyrush.

    Formula

    This motor racing themed coaster proves that Lech is not a fluke. Vekoma's liquid smooth track work shines through again. The LSM launch has a decent amount of power, the first inversion is full of hangtime and the fast-paced, low to the ground layout provides good pops of airtime and features two eerily smooth rolling inversions. A very short coaster which packs a lot into its layout. For me, the third best coaster of the trip.

    Dragon Roller Coaster

    Another excellent ride by Vekoma. This Suspended Family Coaster is a clone of Orkanen at Farum Sommerland and would be my first ride on a SFC. For what is supposed to be a family coaster, this ride has a surprising amount of kick to it and manages to be glass smooth. It also features a station fly through which seems to be a common feature among Polish Coasters.

    Overall, I preferred it to the park's SLC. I know that seems like a very low bar of comparison, but with the vest restraints leaving nothing to bang your head against, the standard SLC layout improves a lot and becomes quite enjoyable. It's still a bit on the rough side though.


    So that's it for my slightly truncated trip report of these two parks. A great few days in a country I've never visited before. I definitely plan on returning. The unexpected outcome for me is that I am apparently now a Vekoma fan boy. All hail our new Dutch overlords.
     
    Last edited: 30th Sep 2018
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  14. Matt Creek

    Matt Creek TowersStreet Member

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    As much as Energylandia is on my park bucket list, I cannot help but feel the park is definitely quantity over quality judging from pictures, POVS, vlogs etc..

    Unfortunately the place seems void of any character, style and correlation, with ‘off the shelf’ rides literally just plonked down in every corner with a few bits of cheap and tacky theming added. It makes even Merlin’s weaker attractions look better in comparison and looks either like a large permanent fun fair or the result of a 5 year old in RCT sandbox mode.

    Hyperion looks considerably better than a lot of the park and hopefully adds some optimism the park will begin to add better quality attractions over time. An RMC is promising as long as the styling is carried out correctly.
     
  15. Danny

    Danny TPWW's no.1 Fan

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    There's no questioning Energylandia lacks character and atmosphere; there's just too many styles clashing against each other to create a harmonious mix. If Mayan, Dragon and Boomerang were all treated to a greater scope of better build quality theming, they'd make for excellent little areas of the park with surprisingly great rides.

    There is a rather quaint area of the park between Hyperion and Boomerang that I omitted from my report that features a few kids and water rides that is actually well done, but we didn't spend enough time in it to justify including it in the full report.

    The park have proven they have the have the ability to marry good rides with theming, I simply fear the abundance of investment they've had to carry out means the essence of crafting a theme park has been forgotten about. Hopefully the park start to slow down on the sheer number of rides being added and start to focus on the finer, intricate details. It would probably take the same amount of time the park has been open to totally re-organise the infrastructure and make it feel more permanent, but with committed time and care, Energylandia could be radically turned around.
     
    Posted 1st Oct 2018
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