Autism the thread

BarryZola

TS Member
So you could potentially send an email or get someone to phone them up for you, but you just want them to provide you with the exact option that you want? I think sometimes we have to try to meet people/companies half-way. Seems like you're more interested in picking holes in the companies system than just getting your complaint dealt with (without knowing the exact details). Maybe they're just understaffed or something like most companies at the moment so can only provide so many contact options. But yeah, it's your life, just do what you want.
 

imanautie

TS Member
So you could potentially send an email or get someone to phone them up for you, but you just want them to provide you with the exact option that you want? I think sometimes we have to try to meet people/companies half-way. Seems like you're more interested in picking holes in the companies system than just getting your complaint dealt with (without knowing the exact details). Maybe they're just understaffed or something like most companies at the moment so can only provide so many contact options. But yeah, it's your life, just do what you want.
The laws pretty clear, pretty much all other TOCs get it right in having non phone options.
I'm not asking for a specific method just a not the phone one.

The original issue is they haven't replied to a delay repay claim filed 08th may.
 

BarryZola

TS Member
Looks like you're stuck then if you're not willing to get in touch through either email (that you stated a couple of messages ago) or get someone to call for you. Enjoy your quest for justice.
 

imanautie

TS Member
Looks like you're stuck then if you're not willing to get in touch through either email (that you stated a couple of messages ago) or get someone to call for you. Enjoy your quest for justice.
I've got other methods (and to be clear it's the direct contact of the right team that's the reason I'm not using the general CS email)
 

NuttySquirrel

TS Member
Looks like you're stuck then if you're not willing to get in touch through either email (that you stated a couple of messages ago) or get someone to call for you. Enjoy your quest for justice.
That seems unnecessarily belligerent. Autism is classed as a disability, therefore autistic people are entitled to request reasonable adjustments from service providers and they have a legal duty to accommodate them. A company as large and established as CrossCountry ought to be well aware of that. It's pretty disgraceful that they're shirking their responsibilities in this regard. Whether or not you personally think that autistic people are entitled to reasonable adjustments or not is irrelevant when it's written into UK law that they are.
 

BarryZola

TS Member
Next time anyone has an issue with rich people using complicated tax avoidance schemes that fall just about within UK law, when they could just pay their tax but don't want to, just remember that because it's UK law it shouldn't ever be questioned.
 

rob666

TS Member
Unfortunately, the law is not particularly clear.
The particular weasel word used in the act, for businesses to avoid responsibility, is "reasonable".
Anyone like to define, in law, what a "reasonable" adjustment is?
Not easy without a legal team with a decent knowledge of case law.
The company could argue that it has made reasonable changes, and any further change would be unreasonable on cost grounds.
I have had similar arguments with rail companies over disabled escorts for blind young people and wheelchair assistance for change of trains.
Three lengthy complaints, three lengthy written discussions over what is reasonable.
If there is an alternative method of contact, even if it is technically to the wrong department, then your chances of a legal remedy are pretty much non existent, in my practical experience.
 
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imanautie

TS Member
Unfortunately, the law is not particularly clear.
The particular weasel word used in the act, for businesses to avoid responsibility, is "reasonable".
Anyone like to define, in law, what a "reasonable" adjustment is?
Not easy without a legal team with a decent knowledge of case law.
The company could argue that it has made reasonable changes, and any further change would be unreasonable on cost grounds.
I have had similar arguments with rail companies over disabled escorts for blind young people and wheelchair assistance for change of trains.
Three lengthy complains, three lengthy written discussions over what is reasonable.
If there is an alternative method of contact, even if it is technically to the wrong department, then your chances of a legal remedy are pretty much non existent, in my practical experience.
We shall see :)
I'm surprised the twitter rep didn't ask for my reference number to poke the DR team internally
 

Matt N

TS Member
Favourite Ride
Mako (SeaWorld Orlando)
Sorry to bump the thread after a bit of inactivity, but something happened today that I’d be intrigued to know some of your thoughts on.

Basically, I got a letter in the post today inviting me for a 4th COVID vaccine. That wasn’t a surprise; my autism puts me in JCVI group 6, so I got invited for my initial one early, my second and third doses happened early as well, and I was also invited for a flu vaccine last winter, so I was kind of expecting to be invited for a 4th jab.

However, the main thing I was wanting to discuss with you was the way in which my letter was written. I thought that this was the way everyone’s vaccine invitation letter was written, but my letter was written using short blocks of pretty large writing to explain each individual step of the process with a big picture attached to each one. This letter overall spanned a good few double sided pages of A4. It was sort of like the social stories I used to have to explain how things were going to happen when I was in primary school, if any of you ever had those.

It would probably be easier to explain if I uploaded photos, but I’m not 100% sure whether you’re allowed to upload photos of your vaccine invitation letter onto the internet, so I thought I’d best refrain from it to stay on the safe side as it were.

As I say, I thought this was how everyone’s invitation letter was written; I had a similar letter sent to me regarding my flu vaccine invite last winter. However, my mum was very bemused when she looked at this letter, and explained that she was merely sent 1 page of A4 saying little other than “book your COVID vaccination”. She assumed that they must have sent me the more visual letter because of my autism.

For clarity, I do not need a different letter. I can read and comprehend a regular letter just fine. Regardless, I thought it was thoughtful and appreciated the sentiment, even if I ultimately didn’t need my NHS letters written in this way. My mum, however, said she was insulted by it on my behalf and thought it was terrible that they thought I needed a different letter just because of my autism.

I must admit, though, I do feel a little embarrassed to have received a different type of letter to everyone else…

I was only going to ask; what would you guys’ thoughts be on this? Would you find it thoughtful albeit unneeded like me, or would you find it insulting like my mum?
 

QTXAdsy

TS Member
Favourite Ride
Black Hole
Sorry to bump the thread after a bit of inactivity, but something happened today that I’d be intrigued to know some of your thoughts on.

Basically, I got a letter in the post today inviting me for a 4th COVID vaccine. That wasn’t a surprise; my autism puts me in JCVI group 6, so I got invited for my initial one early, my second and third doses happened early as well, and I was also invited for a flu vaccine last winter, so I was kind of expecting to be invited for a 4th jab.

However, the main thing I was wanting to discuss with you was the way in which my letter was written. I thought that this was the way everyone’s vaccine invitation letter was written, but my letter was written using short blocks of pretty large writing to explain each individual step of the process with a big picture attached to each one. This letter overall spanned a good few double sided pages of A4. It was sort of like the social stories I used to have to explain how things were going to happen when I was in primary school, if any of you ever had those.

It would probably be easier to explain if I uploaded photos, but I’m not 100% sure whether you’re allowed to upload photos of your vaccine invitation letter onto the internet, so I thought I’d best refrain from it to stay on the safe side as it were.

As I say, I thought this was how everyone’s invitation letter was written; I had a similar letter sent to me regarding my flu vaccine invite last winter. However, my mum was very bemused when she looked at this letter, and explained that she was merely sent 1 page of A4 saying little other than “book your COVID vaccination”. She assumed that they must have sent me the more visual letter because of my autism.

For clarity, I do not need a different letter. I can read and comprehend a regular letter just fine. Regardless, I thought it was thoughtful and appreciated the sentiment, even if I ultimately didn’t need my NHS letters written in this way. My mum, however, said she was insulted by it on my behalf and thought it was terrible that they thought I needed a different letter just because of my autism.

I must admit, though, I do feel a little embarrassed to have received a different type of letter to everyone else…

I was only going to ask; what would you guys’ thoughts be on this? Would you find it thoughtful albeit unneeded like me, or would you find it insulting like my mum?
Funny you should say that as I got my notice of getting my fourth jag for tomorrow about a couple of days ago though mines came from an email and not a letter which I did find rather strange but hey-ho, what'd I know? Very strange though the way they have sent it to you though, mines was rather just a what I thought was a typical response though why I never got a letter like with the others is a bit strange as personally I like to have something physical to hold rather than using your phone to get in as why whenever I go to a convention, I prefer using paper tickets than getting the email out on your phone.

What you're saying about the way it was written to you does seem a little insulting IMO but maybe this is them trying to appeal to all as best they can though unfortunately this is a case of overcorrection which unfortunately is more common than we seem to realise. Personally, though I wouldn't try and let it bring me down, as long as I get the jag needed to get me through the winter then that's all that matters. Not sure if I'm helpful on the matter but that's my thoughts on it at least.
 

Skyscraper

TS Member
Favourite Ride
Nemesis
Sorry to bump the thread after a bit of inactivity, but something happened today that I’d be intrigued to know some of your thoughts on.

Basically, I got a letter in the post today inviting me for a 4th COVID vaccine. That wasn’t a surprise; my autism puts me in JCVI group 6, so I got invited for my initial one early, my second and third doses happened early as well, and I was also invited for a flu vaccine last winter, so I was kind of expecting to be invited for a 4th jab.

However, the main thing I was wanting to discuss with you was the way in which my letter was written. I thought that this was the way everyone’s vaccine invitation letter was written, but my letter was written using short blocks of pretty large writing to explain each individual step of the process with a big picture attached to each one. This letter overall spanned a good few double sided pages of A4. It was sort of like the social stories I used to have to explain how things were going to happen when I was in primary school, if any of you ever had those.

It would probably be easier to explain if I uploaded photos, but I’m not 100% sure whether you’re allowed to upload photos of your vaccine invitation letter onto the internet, so I thought I’d best refrain from it to stay on the safe side as it were.

As I say, I thought this was how everyone’s invitation letter was written; I had a similar letter sent to me regarding my flu vaccine invite last winter. However, my mum was very bemused when she looked at this letter, and explained that she was merely sent 1 page of A4 saying little other than “book your COVID vaccination”. She assumed that they must have sent me the more visual letter because of my autism.

For clarity, I do not need a different letter. I can read and comprehend a regular letter just fine. Regardless, I thought it was thoughtful and appreciated the sentiment, even if I ultimately didn’t need my NHS letters written in this way. My mum, however, said she was insulted by it on my behalf and thought it was terrible that they thought I needed a different letter just because of my autism.

I must admit, though, I do feel a little embarrassed to have received a different type of letter to everyone else…

I was only going to ask; what would you guys’ thoughts be on this? Would you find it thoughtful albeit unneeded like me, or would you find it insulting like my mum?
I get easy-to-read letters from the NHS all the time Matt, even though I'm perfectly able to read like you. It's very annoying, but I just lump it as it's probably an as-standard thing.
 

Matt N

TS Member
Favourite Ride
Mako (SeaWorld Orlando)
I didn’t find it insulting, as I appreciate the sentiment and I fully understand the reasoning behind the blanket approach, but I’ll admit I was a tad embarrassed when my mum looked so bemused by it and said she got a more “regular” letter…
 

NuttySquirrel

TS Member
Sorry to bump the thread after a bit of inactivity, but something happened today that I’d be intrigued to know some of your thoughts on.

Basically, I got a letter in the post today inviting me for a 4th COVID vaccine. That wasn’t a surprise; my autism puts me in JCVI group 6, so I got invited for my initial one early, my second and third doses happened early as well, and I was also invited for a flu vaccine last winter, so I was kind of expecting to be invited for a 4th jab.

However, the main thing I was wanting to discuss with you was the way in which my letter was written. I thought that this was the way everyone’s vaccine invitation letter was written, but my letter was written using short blocks of pretty large writing to explain each individual step of the process with a big picture attached to each one. This letter overall spanned a good few double sided pages of A4. It was sort of like the social stories I used to have to explain how things were going to happen when I was in primary school, if any of you ever had those.

It would probably be easier to explain if I uploaded photos, but I’m not 100% sure whether you’re allowed to upload photos of your vaccine invitation letter onto the internet, so I thought I’d best refrain from it to stay on the safe side as it were.

As I say, I thought this was how everyone’s invitation letter was written; I had a similar letter sent to me regarding my flu vaccine invite last winter. However, my mum was very bemused when she looked at this letter, and explained that she was merely sent 1 page of A4 saying little other than “book your COVID vaccination”. She assumed that they must have sent me the more visual letter because of my autism.

For clarity, I do not need a different letter. I can read and comprehend a regular letter just fine. Regardless, I thought it was thoughtful and appreciated the sentiment, even if I ultimately didn’t need my NHS letters written in this way. My mum, however, said she was insulted by it on my behalf and thought it was terrible that they thought I needed a different letter just because of my autism.

I must admit, though, I do feel a little embarrassed to have received a different type of letter to everyone else…

I was only going to ask; what would you guys’ thoughts be on this? Would you find it thoughtful albeit unneeded like me, or would you find it insulting like my mum?
I got my booster invite on Monday, I'm in group 6 on account of having coeliac disease. I got mine by text, no letter or email. Unfortunately it was a case of shutting the stable door after the horse bolted as I'd just tested positive for Covid. FFS...

Re your letter: I believe I've come across this before, it's called 'Easy Read' and is intended to make complex information (medical/legal) simple to understand for those with intellectual disabilities.

What they've failed to grasp here is that autism isn't an intellectual disability - if you have to categorise it at all it's a learning difference. They shouldn't be sending you dumbed-down letters by default just because you are autistic. You would be well within your rights to feel insulted, they have fundamentally failed to understand your needs.

We are sometimes asked at work to produce 'Easy Read' documents by NHS and LA clients to explain our product but we don't because although the majority of our users are autistic or neurodiverse in other ways they're all intelligent and literate and capable of reading standard documents.

There is so much ignorance and misinformation out there it's just depressing.
 

Matt N

TS Member
Favourite Ride
Mako (SeaWorld Orlando)
I’ve had a Google, and that “Easy Read” you talk about is exactly the style of letter they sent me.

I’ll admit I was a touch embarrassed to discover that I didn't get a regular letter, but I guess it’s not really a problem in the grand scheme of things… I appreciate the sentiment and understand the reason why I was sent one in spite of not needing one, even if I am slightly embarrassed by the fact I am perceived as needing it according to the NHS…
 

Skyscraper

TS Member
Favourite Ride
Nemesis
I’ve had a Google, and that “Easy Read” you talk about is exactly the style of letter they sent me.

I’ll admit I was a touch embarrassed to discover that I didn't get a regular letter, but I guess it’s not really a problem in the grand scheme of things… I appreciate the sentiment and understand the reason why I was sent one in spite of not needing one, even if I am slightly embarrassed by the fact I am perceived as needing it according to the NHS…
Yeah I got the easy read one too.
 

Jonathan

TS Member
Favourite Ride
Helix <3
I'm still surprised I haven't had my next COVID booster, given I'm also in group 6 on account of being autistic.
 

NuttySquirrel

TS Member
I’ve had a Google, and that “Easy Read” you talk about is exactly the style of letter they sent me.

I’ll admit I was a touch embarrassed to discover that I didn't get a regular letter, but I guess it’s not really a problem in the grand scheme of things… I appreciate the sentiment and understand the reason why I was sent one in spite of not needing one, even if I am slightly embarrassed by the fact I am perceived as needing it according to the NHS…
Glad you're able to rationalize it Matt, I guess it's not on me to be angry on your behalf but it does frustrate me. The NHS knows next to nothing about neurodiversity, training is woefully inadequate and people are being gaslit, talked down to and denied support left, right and centre. I see it daily in my job and it's so upsetting. Your letter is just a prime example of just how far off the mark they are. They need to do better.
 

QTXAdsy

TS Member
Favourite Ride
Black Hole
Actually, speaking of booster jags, made a bit or a cock up about mine. I was right that it's for the fouth...but for next month and not today and it just so happens that my parents are in at exactly the same time that day for the jag.

Yeah, my autism can lead me to not reading things correctly at times. Great, feel like a fool now. 😓
 
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